Arguing with the post office again...

bigwallastyle

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So I receive four bubble mailers back yesterday with a note attached that I need to affix more postage as they are "parcels". Nevermind the fact that the idiot bhind the counter meant package rate. That's just the start. Since 12/1, I have completed 88 trades and do you know how many have been sent back for postage? You guessed it: four. As I have fought with the guy who overcharges me in person, I decided to fight fire with fire. I printed off the USPS web page that states:

Large Envelope

Dimension Minimum* Maximum

Height 6-1/8 inches 12 inches
Length 11-1/2 inches 15 inches
Thickness 1/4 inch 3/4 inch

* Large envelopes exceed at least one of these dimensions.

For example, an envelope 10 long x 8 inches high x 1/4 inch thick is considered a large envelope because it exceeds the minimum height dimension.

Large envelopes that are rigid, nonrectangular, or not uniformly thick pay package prices.

For large envelopes, length is the longest dimension.

For larger items, see package prices.

I then mailed him a letter with this info enclosed and explained that when I send a bubble mailer that is between 1/4 and 3/4 amd uniformly thick; it is a large envelope, not a package. Since I'm pretty sure this guy can't read anyway, I'm not sure it will matter but I'm hoping to hear back from the postmaster on this one.

If your PO is charging you package rates, take this in and argue. An apple is an apple, a large envelope is a large envelope regardless of how your postal worker can't read his/ her own website.

Tom
 

ragtop12

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Is the complaint you are paying package rates over large envelope? If so, this kills it:

"Large envelopes that are rigid, nonrectangular, or not uniformly thick pay package prices." Cards are rigid
 

bigwallastyle

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Yes, that is my complaint; however, nowhere on my envelopes does it say they can't machine them. I don't write the "do not bend". That is why they are securely packaged in a topload and more if necessary. If a PWE with a toploaded card can be machined and make it 99.9% of the time without being bent, then a bubble mailer with secure packaging can do the same so actually that is irrevelvant unless the sender declares the package as non-machinable by writing "DO Not bend" or something similar on the envelope.

Is the complaint you are paying package rates over large envelope? If so, this kills it:

"Large envelopes that are rigid, nonrectangular, or not uniformly thick pay package prices." Cards are rigid
 

ragtop12

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Still... they are rigid... and cards in toploaders in a PWE SHOULDNT be machined... it doesn't matter it is is bent or whatever when it goes thorough, it is just the rule. Still, you argument is invalid, as it clearly states if it is rigid, it goes to a package... the last I checked, cards between toploaders are rigid since you can not bend them in half.

I have become close friends with the local post master and he explained it all to me several times... and if this is your biggest complaint, I'd get out of the hobby as it is only going to get worse.
 

ragtop12

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oh and what makes something non machineable isnt if you write DO NOT BEND... it is if it is RIGID
 

75zito

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Every time I go to the P.O. they always pull out some "cardboard cutout" to see if it fits through easily. Even when I use PWE they always charge me .22 or something extra, because they say the "toploader" will not go through!


Christopher
 

mlbme22

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I understand your complaint- don't really see why Ragtop wants to fight with you. You had a problem with the PO & the guy there is a jerk. I hate it when the people at the PO are rude or don't understand. I have mailed cards at many different post offices & many times get charged different rates- lol
 

ragtop12

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I'm not arguing, just stating why his logic is incorect and why it is being charged at package rate. Just trying to help people understand this as I've seen so many threads about the same very topic with the same very argument every since the rates changed
 

bigwallastyle

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I obviously struck a nerve with Ragtop and that happens. Not intentional and my motivation was clearly not to upset him. I have posted this other times. My real problem is that I have sent over 100 trades since 12/1. Most in bubble mailers. All have gone through with no problem until yesterday.

Either 1: The employees can't interpret their rules the same way (which is clearly the truth- I drive to the next PO down the highway and they always charge me the large envelope rate) and as a result, we get overcharged- or maybe undercharged but I don't think so according to the web site.

Or 2: These guys are making honest mistakes about their own rates. It clearly states that any envelope between 1/4 and 3/4 is a large envelope price. The other workers that have handled the other 96 or so envelopes since 12/1 didn't send them back so I'm inclined to believe that the other 96 were correct and this guy isn't. And to address the rigidity argument, the rigid argument only applies to envelopes they can't machine. They clearly can machine these as none of my packages are being destroyed (and no PWE's w/ toploads are either) and none are being returned for a nonmachinable increase in postage cost.

The bottom line is this is one of my pet peeves. I just don't think that it's right.

Tom
 

JamesNevans

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In some clerks minds a bubble envelope equals package. I don't use bubble envelopes on 90%+ of my mailings, but I use a bubble sleeve cut from one (a used one) and place it in a white envelope. It's the same thickness and protection, maybe better because the toploaded card doesn't slide around, and I pay large envelope rate and even many times it goes out as letter rate (non-machinable), especially if it's one card.
 

David K.

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I'm normally trading or buying or selling rate is over 3 per day....I have done over 3,300 mailings in about a three year period....and it still is amazing that one post office charges about $1.05 for a 4X8 bubble envelope with "DO NOT BEND" and the other were I work....charges $1.39 for the exact same bubble envelope! .......and whats even more strange...is that theres a certain employee near the office that I work who charges the $1.05 rate....while the rest of them at that office charge $1.39? The system is very confusing and most of the Postal employees that I talked to agree! And yes....I do see the newer postal workers pulling out the cardboard cut out and check out the bubble envelope size. Best regards, David
 

dlackey

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I have taken packages to 3 different post office's and honestly get charged 3 different rates. i think the problem is that the workers behind the counter look at packages different and their own rules they don't understand as i have been told that from a lady i use quite often behind the counter at one of the PO i use. I have one Post office that i use in the town where i work and it's a small PO, she has tried to charge me .88 cents for a bubble mailer when it usually is $1.39 at the others. I always ask here to put an extra stamp on there just to make sure there is no postage due on it when it arrives. I have received 5 postage dues in the last 10 days myself.

Dennis
________
Buy vaporgenie
 
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akamikey2001

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The PO defently doesnt know what there doing. I use 3 different places myself & get charged various amounts for a bubble envelope with 1 card inside (88 cents, $1.05, $1.19 & $1.39). I use to battle with this certain lady & figured it wasnt worth the fustration... I even went as far as using an empty bubble mailer to see how much it would cost. She weighed it out then i tore it up in front of her showing that she was charging me $1.39 even if the dang thing is empty :mad: . Her reply was "oh then it would be only 88 cents". What really blows my mind is when i recieve bubble envelopes that costed .60, .64 & .80 cents that had one card in them. So seven different rates for sending the same bubble envelope with 1 card.
 
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mintman2

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Tom,
Sorry pal, but you're absolutely, totally, 100% wrong ! A rigid bubble mailer is a package.

I think the real problem you, and most other people, have is that the rules can be very confusing and even the postal employees don't understand them so they charge different rates. In reality you didn't get screwed on the postage for those four packages, you actually made out like a bandit on the other 96 because the usps system only catches a very few mispostaged items.

Instead of being ticced off you should go to your po and THANK THEM for having a system that allows you to pay less than you're supposed to 96% of the time. That's one reason why I always affix my own postage instead of letting a clerk do it.


mispostaged ???? is that really a word ?
 

Jeffo65

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I wonder how many of those other mailers arrived at the other traders with Postage Due. I know that I have received a few mailers with postage due.
 

ragtop12

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I wonder how many of those other mailers arrived at the other traders with Postage Due. I know that I have received a few mailers with postage due.

Out of all my ebay purchases and all my trades, Ive only had 5 or so come postage due... with ebay, I think it is cause most sellers use the paypal checkout/shipping so it just prints a bar code with no postage price listed, so the PO doesnt bother checking them all... and the ebay ones I did get, the seller gladly refunded what I owed.
 

JamesNevans

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It all depends on what "rigid" is. A cardboard mailer can be considered rigid, but a bubble envelope by itself is not. Is a paper clip rigid? How about a binder clip or a spiral binder? I've received credit card offers with those fake plastic cards, they are certainly more rigid than baseball cards, are the companies paying package rates? Hell no! Uniform size is also subjective, is a quarter inch variance in thickness, or the size of a couple toploaders, the determinant or is there really none?
 
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