Interesting Observation

gotsparks

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Most of you all have heard about the guy who tried to blow up a plane recently. He was on the "watch list" (along with a TON of suspicious things) and still let onboard.

My son on the other hand is 2 years old. His name is Jack.

EVERY SINGLE TIME we go to get our boarding passes, we have to explain that even though he shares his name with some fugitive, he is indeed not the bad guy they're looking for and have to show them his passport (even when we're flying domestic).

The last time was when we were flying home from his grandparents' house. It was just me at the counter and they asked me where "Jack" was. I pointed over to him and said, "he's the hardened criminal over there hugged up on his Nana." :D

I'm glad they double check every time, though. Still wondering how the real bad guy got onboard. Seems like all those long lines in security aren't paying off like they should.
 

Meliah

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I've never flown International before so help me understand a few things here. The guy boarded this flight in Amsterdam I believe. For flights coming into the US from foreign airports how do we enforce security there? Do we work with other countries on this, have our own people there or do the airlines have some sort of responsibility in this as well---or some mix of all of those?
 

Champs96ws

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When I fly overseas, some places have more security than others. Some places I have seen armed military patrolling the airport other it's more laid back.
 

lep1010

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When I fly overseas, some places have more security than others. Some places I have seen armed military patrolling the airport other it's more laid back.

unfortunately I see the same thing HERE !!! in the US .... i'm leaving next week for a two day business trip, I cant wait to see what the security lines/procedures will be like in the three different airports ...
 

gotsparks

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I've never flown International before so help me understand a few things here. The guy boarded this flight in Amsterdam I believe. For flights coming into the US from foreign airports how do we enforce security there? Do we work with other countries on this, have our own people there or do the airlines have some sort of responsibility in this as well---or some mix of all of those?

Almost ALL nations have access to each others' "watch" and "no-fly" lists.

When I fly overseas, some places have more security than others. Some places I have seen armed military patrolling the airport other it's more laid back.

Agreed. Middle East and Europe were more stringent in my opinion.
 

DaClyde

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Unfortunately, failure by ANY country's security procedures means universal punishment for travelers. Apparently it's OUR fault they're not very good at their job and the extra rules and restrictions are supposed to somehow make them better. Typical government response...failure can only be due to insufficient restrictions, not lack of enforcement. And the solution is obviously more restrictions.

Kind of like how excessive government waste is always solved by increasing the amount of money flowing into the government.
 

97honda

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When I flew to Sweden and back it was easy. When we arrived in Sweden we showed our passports and explained why we were there. Leaving Sweden we were questioned twice and passports checked both times. Once arriving in the US we showed our passports and went through, very simple laid back here.
 

Jaybo374

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Back in the mid 90s, I went to Ireland after I graduated from college to visit distant relatives. My flight itinerary had me fly from Boston to London's Heathrow to Dublin. Once in Heathrow, I had to switch terminals and rush to catch my connecting flight to Dublin.

I was stopped in my tracks by airport security and detained for several hours and interrogated while they checked my paperwork and such.

Why? Because I....

1) was traveling alone
2) have an Irish sounding last name (Bohannon)
3) was in my early twenties
4) flying from Boston - a large source of aid comes from here to the IRA
5) during talks between the U.K. and Sinn Fein

The bottom line is that I fit a profile to British security. After a several hours of inconvenience, they sent me on my way.

Now, this guy.....

1) bought a one-way ticket
2) paid for it in cash
3) had no luggage
4) is on the "Watch" list meaning that he is not restricted from travel, but should be under intense scrutiny
5) and had his father, a credible source (former Minister of Economy in Nigeria and President of a London bank), call the American consulate in Nigeria saying that his son was probably a jihadist

What's wrong here?

Just my 2 cents.
 

Taliasen

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We had typical security when we flew to China. Travel in China (domistic in China) was another story. Fully armed (and facemasked) military at every medical and security checkpoint. We were lucky, but some of our travel mates had their luggage completely gone through twice! In Shanghi on our way back to the US was not as bad. We had flown domestically into Shanghi and never left the concourse during our layover. I understand why the US government does it, but even with 100% of the correct paperwork from the US gov., China gov., our adoption agency, and Gabe's China passport, we were still detained in Chicago immigration while there was a problem with the backgrond check on Gabe.

Seriously? We adopted him at 3yo as an abandoned orphan from a Chinese govt. run orphanage with absolutely NO WAY of finding any parents or other birth relatives or criminal history. We have all of the paperwork that US and China told us to have and you are not going to admit my son because you can not pull a background check on his non-existant background?

Tal
 
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