Need help figuring out a 1952 Mantle reprint

Xdj511

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I picked up a 1952 Topps Mantle reprint at a show a while back and I have been trying to figure out where exactly it came from. It is a straight-up reprint, nothing to identify it as anything else. My research shows that the '52 reprint set that came out in the early 80's had the words "Topps 1952 Reprint Series" on the bottom middle of the back, but this card has "Topps Baseball". It is the non-standard size, the size of the original 1952 Topps set. I always figured this was some kind of off-brand knock-off, but does anyone know for sure?

Thank you.
 

NYBBNUTT

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As a Mantle collector I’d be very interested in learning what you find out. And a picture would help as there have been and will continue to be reprints of the ‘52 Topps RC which now looks like it has surpassed the Honus Wagner card having recently sold for $12.6M. A few years ago I bought a ‘69 Topps reprint for a few $ but it was not a Topps reprint. The back looked like the regular card but just said ‘Reprint’. I looked everywhere but found no information on the rogue company that produced it.
 

NYBBNUTT

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I found this on an ISA grading site.

'As always, side by side its easier to spot the difference between the two. However, not having a comparable real card right next to the fake can make it tricky to spot.

Using a jeweler's loop to zoom in on any spot, we chose the Yankees logo. In the counterfeit version, we see granular dot pixels indicating that the card has been photocopied, where the original is much more clean and dot free. Turning the card over to the back, real versions will have much more bold colors, solid brown paper stock with bold black writing and bright red printing. Counterfeit versions will all be slightly faded, which can once again be more noticeable under a jeweler's loop.

The last thing to always look at is the white print dot about a inch to the left of Mantle's eyebrow. This print dot is not always a perfect science, and isn't found on every authentic 1952 Topps Mantle rookie. However, it is on a high enough percentage that we will double check all of the steps above to ensure the card's authenticity. Due to the value of this card, and the inherent risk involved in its potential purchase, now is a great time to stay away from ungraded copies and focus on graded examples from a few of the industry's most trusted grading companies.'
 

Xdj511

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Well, I'm sure it's not real lol. I was just trying to figure out if it was some kind of catalogued reprint. I know it's not from the '52 reprint set Topps put out in the early 80's, but I thought maybe it belonged to something else.
 

NYBBNUTT

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Sure I was just trying to point out that since there is nothing to distinguish it from the original that you may need to find something subtle in the printing to identify who produced it. Unfortunately there are so many counterfeit copies made that it maybe impossible. I’ve searched for lists or catalogs of this iconic card to no avail. Good luck in your search.
 

mrmopar

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If it is not marked in any way or different from an original by size/thickness or with unique/additional text, serial numbering, gloss, embossing, foil, etc, it is likely a counterfeit card meant to deceive. I'd say with near certainty that ANY legitimate reprints will have some sort of designation as such, as they were not trying to deceive anyone and I am going to make an assumption that if you reprint someone else's item (card or anything from art to watches to jewelry, etc), you need to designate it as such to meet legal requirements. Unfortunately, the hobby has been FLOODED with counterfeit cards being marketed as "reprints"! We also have an influx of people who really don't know what they are doing, using incorrect terms and buying up things that they have no idea what it is. All of this hurts the hobby all around.
 
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