The 5 Most Mind-Blowing Coincidences of All Time

Hoyt55

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I've heard of #s 5 and 4 before, but none of the others. Just plain crazy!

This link was at the bottom of that article, this one has a lot of crazy coincidences too:

http://www.cracked.com/article_17298_6-random-coincidences-that-created-modern-world.html

This one would be #1 on any list though:

One of the oddest coincidences ever recorded spans a period of nearly 200 years and involved three ships that sank in the Menai Strait of the coast of Wales. The first vessel went down on December 5, 1664, and of its 81 passengers, only one survived, and he was called Hugh Williams. On December 5, 1785, 121 years later, another ship sank in the Menai Strait, and again, all of the passenger perished except one – named Hugh Williams.

Two ships sinking in the same area on the same day of the month certainly is not earth-shattering, but when each of them have only one survivor of the same name, it gets a little eerie. But the story does not end at that.

On December 5, 1860, yet another ship, a small 25 passenger vessel, sank in the Menai Strait. And once again there was only one survivor – and once again his name was Hugh Williams.
 

David K.

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I've heard of #s 5 and 4 before, but none of the others. Just plain crazy!

This link was at the bottom of that article, this one has a lot of crazy coincidences too:

http://www.cracked.com/article_17298_6-random-coincidences-that-created-modern-world.html

This one would be #1 on any list though:

One of the oddest coincidences ever recorded spans a period of nearly 200 years and involved three ships that sank in the Menai Strait of the coast of Wales. The first vessel went down on December 5, 1664, and of its 81 passengers, only one survived, and he was called Hugh Williams. On December 5, 1785, 121 years later, another ship sank in the Menai Strait, and again, all of the passenger perished except one – named Hugh Williams.

Two ships sinking in the same area on the same day of the month certainly is not earth-shattering, but when each of them have only one survivor of the same name, it gets a little eerie. But the story does not end at that.

On December 5, 1860, yet another ship, a small 25 passenger vessel, sank in the Menai Strait. And once again there was only one survivor – and once again his name was Hugh Williams.

Isn't William a common name during that period? I would love to see the list of people on all three ships! Best regards, David
 

Hoyt55

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It probably was a relatively common name back then, but it's still unbelievably mindblowing! :)
 

HoosierBuddy

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Bah.

I can do you all one better.

In 1898, an obscure writer named Morgan Robertson wrote a short story called Futility. In this story, a British shipping company built an "unsinkable" ship. This ship was 800 feet long, made of steel and weighed 45000 pounds. It had 3 propellers, 2 masts and 24 lifeboats.

It struck an iceberg, while going 25 Knots, near midnight on an April morning, and sank in the Atlantic ocean. Nearly all of the 3000 people on board his boat died a watery death.

Everybody knows the story of the Titanic. It was built by a British shipping company, was 882.5 feet long, made of steel and weighed 66000 pounds. On a cold April night (at 11:40 PM) it struck an iceberg while going 22.5 Knots and sank into the Atlantic. Of the 2228 people on board, there were only 705 survivors.

An eerie coincidence, yes, but there's ONE little thing I haven't mentioned yet.

Morgan Robertson called his ship the "Titan".
 
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