Most Aesthetically Pleasing Player Penmanships..

sundryvagaries

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..(Subject alliteration unintended).

I thought of this earlier when looking at this AP auction. While my thoughts are mainly limited to Football players (as that's all I collect), I must say that Adrian Peterson's AUTO is just sick. It fits his personage and style of play. It's symmetrical yet gaunt and is always penned well. Here's a perfect example:

http://cgi.ebay.com/2007-UD-ultimate-Adrian-Peterson-auto-rc-83-99_W0QQitemZ140389401862QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Football?hash=item20afdc4506#ht_554wt_1165

If you have pics, post yours, I'd love to see what you have. I'm big into the artistry of the autograph, and can't stand these "initials" autographs guys leave on their cards that look like they busted out two squiggly lines.
 

bdmac1

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I think a lot of the older players have nice signatures, in a time when they actually signed their names. Guys like Reggie Jackson and Sandy Koufax have great, full signatures.

Brian
 

sundryvagaries

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Good ole' Michael Cuddyer! Another Hampton Roads native, occasionally talked about on the Mercurio show locally here. Not a bad sig. at all, looks kind of like a throwback sig. (if there even is such a thing ?:confused:?)..

As for Mussina's auto, enh, hopefully that's not the best example of his auto, almost looks like he signed it "Mile Mussina" :p.
 

dan5

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..(Subject alliteration unintended).

I thought of this earlier when looking at this AP auction. While my thoughts are mainly limited to Football players (as that's all I collect), I must say that Adrian Peterson's AUTO is just sick. It fits his personage and style of play. It's symmetrical yet gaunt and is always penned well. Here's a perfect example:

http://cgi.ebay.com/2007-UD-ultimate-Adrian-Peterson-auto-rc-83-99_W0QQitemZ140389401862QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Football?hash=item20afdc4506#ht_554wt_1165

If you have pics, post yours, I'd love to see what you have. I'm big into the artistry of the autograph, and can't stand these "initials" autographs guys leave on their cards that look like they busted out two squiggly lines.
Just so you know Peterson does not always sign like that. If you were to get him in person you would only get an "AP" and his number.

Cuddyer on the other hand always signs like that and is willing to sign multiples. He is a real nice guy if you ever get a chance to meet him.

So far this Spring Training I have been able to pick up 5 HOFers signatures in person and they are all very nice sigs. They are all complete and legable. It seems like the Old Timers take more pride in there autos.
 
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cpr1981

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I loved Yankees prospect Jesus Montero's autograph...



before he had to start signing A LOT more...



Also, I have always loved most of the old guys autos (Mantle, Killebrew, Kaline)

Colvin
 

timfsu2k

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The older guys have great signatures for the most part. I think it is because they came from a time when the fans were important to them and the players wanted to make sure that the fan came away with a nice momento. Nowadays the player could not care less about the fans, for the most part, so what do they care what their signatures look like.
 

jrchoholic83

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These are the three best looking autos in my opinion (when they take their time like these):





Jeremy
 

sundryvagaries

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AP looks like a scribble. Hate it.
Well I don't believe that "legibility" is the paramount standard of the autograph. I personally think that Griffey AUTO jrchoholic is ridiculously nice.. I mean if it were, then it wouldn't be an autograph it'd be a printed version of their name which probably would detract from what is considered visually pleasing about the autograph.

To Dan5's point, I wouldn't have known but I guess what I mean is when he signs his full name.
 

valediction

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The older guys have great signatures for the most part. I think it is because they came from a time when the fans were important to them and the players wanted to make sure that the fan came away with a nice momento. Nowadays the player could not care less about the fans, for the most part, so what do they care what their signatures look like.
I think it was more the times than the players. It wasn't that long ago it was EXPECTED people would have good penmanship. It was something they made you practice, and practice, and practice. It didn't matter if you were good at baseball, they didn't have 25 reporters covering high school games, ESPN wasn't airing stories of kids to all corners of the world. They didn't have word processors and computers in nearly every home and computer rooms in schools. You handed in a report, it was hand written, and if you hoped to pass, the teacher had better be able to read it somewhat easily. These days my nine year old nephew is writing papers on a computer. I listen to the stories my grandparents and aunts and uncles told, and writing was stressed a lot more than it is now. Add to that, they could actually discipline back then, and when they did, parents backed them up. These days a lot of parents don't see a point to their kids learning penmanship, they argue with the teachers that the kid doesn't need it in this day and age.
 

porkchops

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The older guys have great signatures for the most part. I think it is because they came from a time when the fans were important to them and the players wanted to make sure that the fan came away with a nice momento. Nowadays the player could not care less about the fans, for the most part, so what do they care what their signatures look like.
.
I agree 100%.
Most of todays players should spend some
of that big money on a penmanship course.
Ken
 

timfsu2k

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I think it was more the times than the players. It wasn't that long ago it was EXPECTED people would have good penmanship. It was something they made you practice, and practice, and practice. It didn't matter if you were good at baseball, they didn't have 25 reporters covering high school games, ESPN wasn't airing stories of kids to all corners of the world. They didn't have word processors and computers in nearly every home and computer rooms in schools. You handed in a report, it was hand written, and if you hoped to pass, the teacher had better be able to read it somewhat easily. These days my nine year old nephew is writing papers on a computer. I listen to the stories my grandparents and aunts and uncles told, and writing was stressed a lot more than it is now. Add to that, they could actually discipline back then, and when they did, parents backed them up. These days a lot of parents don't see a point to their kids learning penmanship, they argue with the teachers that the kid doesn't need it in this day and age.
That makes a lot of sense, and I do agree with you. The bolded part is the most significant issue, not just with something relatively unimportant as penmanship, but with the younger generation as a whole. My wife works in the public school system and let me tell you, if they had the disicpline methods that were around when I was in school then my wife wouldn't have the problems that she does.
 

valediction

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That makes a lot of sense, and I do agree with you. The bolded part is the most significant issue, not just with something relatively unimportant as penmanship, but with the younger generation as a whole. My wife works in the public school system and let me tell you, if they had the disicpline methods that were around when I was in school then my wife wouldn't have the problems that she does.
Couldn't agree more. Between that and parent's involvement, it makes a WORLD of difference. I remember some times my dad worked three jobs, my mom was a stay at home mom until probably 5th grade or so. When it came time for conferences, BOTH my parents went, and they talked to my teachers and my sisters teachers. I talk to friends who are teachers today and they tell me how frustrated they are because they spend hours a night for weeks getting ready for conferences and nobody shows up. One friend had 5 parents show up, and four of those were husbands and wives together. 20 plus kids in a farming town in western MN, and she had the parents of _3_ students show up.

I always said I could never be a teacher because I'd be fired after dealing with the first kid that was anything like I was.
 

bigslimdog

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Of my 500+ different Orioles autographs, here are the nicest signatures IMO:





I think this Luke Scott is the nicest of all 500+



and this is the most ridiculous one I have:
 

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