no value beckett pricing

mindbinge

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with all the low print runs in the modern era...Beckett should start putting estimated prices in the price guides...after all they are guides, and i think it's lazy to just put no pricing avail on everything with a low print run...they should figure out a price for everything they list in the database...if they can list it, they can price it.
 

greyminis

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I look at numbered cards that sell on ebay and prices are all over the place...and generally get significantly lower the further away from the release date when player collectors and set builders have had their fill and new releases garner the focus of collector attention. So how does anyone price cards when this is factored in?
 

valediction

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with all the low print runs in the modern era...Beckett should start putting estimated prices in the price guides...after all they are guides, and i think it's lazy to just put no pricing avail on everything with a low print run...they should figure out a price for everything they list in the database...if they can list it, they can price it.

How?

There was another post on the Bench the other day about a Reggie Jackson Patch/auto 10. Ebay had a couple different Reggie patch/auto's /10 from 2005 UD
one sold for $19.50, one for over $50. Other people on this board were talking about low #'ed cards ranging from $25 to over $100.

I picked up a Joe Mauer insert /25 for $2, I saw the same card sell at a show for $50.

I've picked up Greg Maddux inserts /50 for 49 cents, and seen the same card ebay for over $20
 

timfsu2k

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Yea, the prices are all over the place on that low #'d stuff. I do recall Beckett having a generic low #'d guide in their paper magazine a few years ago. Anyone else remember this?
 

mindbinge

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How? Same way they price everything else...take the regular issues and factor in some sort of rareness and give it your best guess...I think 1/1's that are parallels like the topps platinum's could be priced...keeping in mind it's a "GUIDE" and not a selling price thats set in stone...just saying, it would be nice to see some of the /6 Score End Zone's have some sort of structured guide and so on...people can still sell and buy for more or less, but it would be nice to have a point of reference.
 

JamesNevans

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I use a progression, if a tier with 200 copies is say $2.50 and the 100 at $4.00 and the 50 is $6.00, then the 25 may well be $10.00 and 15 or 10 at $15.00 because it is a factor of about 1.5x for the know quantities. Autographs or rookies may be 1.2x just simply because the value is in the auto or rookie designation rather than the rarity.

More popular or premium brands will bring in a lot more due to interest, take Topps or even Bowman brands as people will pay a lot more for a Topps Black numbered in the 50s over say Leaf.
 

MrBlackisBack

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Yea, the prices are all over the place on that low #'d stuff. I do recall Beckett having a generic low #'d guide in their paper magazine a few years ago. Anyone else remember this?

I do remember this. It was even on the website for a brief amount of time. I still refer to it from time to time in old hard copies. I wish they still did something similar to this. I don't need it for my player collections, but for anything else it would be nice.
 

ragtop12

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I use a progression, if a tier with 200 copies is say $2.50 and the 100 at $4.00 and the 50 is $6.00, then the 25 may well be $10.00 and 15 or 10 at $15.00 because it is a factor of about 1.5x for the know quantities. Autographs or rookies may be 1.2x just simply because the value is in the auto or rookie designation rather than the rarity.

More popular or premium brands will bring in a lot more due to interest, take Topps or even Bowman brands as people will pay a lot more for a Topps Black numbered in the 50s over say Leaf.

I do the same thing. Seems to work fairly well and my co-trader typically agrees with what I come up with.
 

mrmopar

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The same fluctuation can be said for cards that are priced. Complete set prices that don't even cover the top 10 cards individually listed. Oddball sets that never show up that are priced like 1982 Topps/KMart sets! The prices we rely so heavily on are basically crap anyway. It's all based on previous issues and the ratios between the susperstars, stars and commons never change. Top card is $3, 2nd tier is $2.50. 3rd tier is $2...so on and so forth.

It used to bug me that some local dealers wouldn't sell singles from new product until they "booked"! If the dealers are breaking the first of the new product and selling singles to establish a price, how is it that prices can still be determined when nobody was selling UNTIL the price came out. Where in the hell did that price come from???

Beckett used to have a low serial number estimator, but it was mainly based on star status for price ranges, much like the singles. I remember the top guys switched back and forth, but in the hey day it was Griffey, Bonds, Piazza, Clemens, McGwire, Ripken and later Jeter, Arod, etc. They were all within 25-50 cents from each other and the rest were half as much or less.

I agree. If Beckett has as much of a hold on the pricing industry as I believe they do, they can cite individual ebay sales (they used to do that too) and come up with a roundabout price to expect and when one sells for less, it's simple a steal or a tough moment for the seller.
 

valediction

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The same fluctuation can be said for cards that are priced. Complete set prices that don't even cover the top 10 cards individually listed. Oddball sets that never show up that are priced like 1982 Topps/KMart sets! The prices we rely so heavily on are basically crap anyway. It's all based on previous issues and the ratios between the susperstars, stars and commons never change. Top card is $3, 2nd tier is $2.50. 3rd tier is $2...so on and so forth.

It used to bug me that some local dealers wouldn't sell singles from new product until they "booked"! If the dealers are breaking the first of the new product and selling singles to establish a price, how is it that prices can still be determined when nobody was selling UNTIL the price came out. Where in the hell did that price come from???

Beckett used to have a low serial number estimator, but it was mainly based on star status for price ranges, much like the singles. I remember the top guys switched back and forth, but in the hey day it was Griffey, Bonds, Piazza, Clemens, McGwire, Ripken and later Jeter, Arod, etc. They were all within 25-50 cents from each other and the rest were half as much or less.

I agree. If Beckett has as much of a hold on the pricing industry as I believe they do, they can cite individual ebay sales (they used to do that too) and come up with a roundabout price to expect and when one sells for less, it's simple a steal or a tough moment for the seller.

But in cases where they fluctuate, which is the roundabout price? What about cards that have one or two posted sales a year and they vary by that much? take the Maddux card, I paid 49 cents, someone paid $20+, if you don't find another for sale for 8 months or a year and one suddenly pops up, should he expect $1 or $20? What if Burbank gets a hold of it and one of their clients pays the overly inflated price and it goes for $44.99, or someone lists it as a Maddux parallel and doesn't include a scan or the fact that it's numbered? and it goes for the .99 cent opening bid?
 

mindbinge

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But in cases where they fluctuate, which is the roundabout price? What about cards that have one or two posted sales a year and they vary by that much? take the Maddux card, I paid 49 cents, someone paid $20+, if you don't find another for sale for 8 months or a year and one suddenly pops up, should he expect $1 or $20? What if Burbank gets a hold of it and one of their clients pays the overly inflated price and it goes for $44.99, or someone lists it as a Maddux parallel and doesn't include a scan or the fact that it's numbered? and it goes for the .99 cent opening bid?

again, it's only a guide.

prices will fluctuate from month to month, season to season...day to day even.

The point is to have some sort of guidance so that the seller and buyer have some sort of idea as to what the card is worth in the first place...and with low numbered cards there may never be a sale to reference in some cases and there may 4 of 5 sold in others...in statistics there are outliners that get thrown out and you can still figure an avg....i'm saying if you have parallels that have print runs like the score set for example of xxx/499, xxx/100, xxx/32, and so on...then you should be able to figure the x/6 as well or get at least some sort of idea.
 

David K.

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Yea, the prices are all over the place on that low #'d stuff. I do recall Beckett having a generic low #'d guide in their paper magazine a few years ago. Anyone else remember this?

I also remember this! Probably to many headaches for them taking to keep everything updated. Best regards, David
 

mrmopar

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Obviously there will be extreme cases and I would feel good about saying the average cost in your example is $20. You got an extreme deal and Burbank is whacked in the head!

I happens all the time. My latest Garvey printing plate cost me $15 and change + s/h. Before that, it might have been $75 for the one prior. I still think you can "price" a Garvey 1/1 based on recent sales. The factor I would use other than a brand premium (because nothing HAS to sell for Beckett value...it's only a guide) is parallels/inserts in category 1, game used in category 2 and autographs in category 3, much like numbered cards tend to be priced. Super special cards like bat barrels, 10x auto'd cards and the like will never have an "average" price but run of the mill cards could.

Using my example and some of the ranges I have seen, let's say we have a Topps Garvey card which is a purple parallel to the regular set, 1/1. It might book for $40 (remember, you don't usually get or have to pay book for anything, so maybe it sells for $15-25. Next you have the UD Batting glove GU insert set, 1/1. Maybe that has a BV of $60 (selling in the $25-40 range realistically). Finally you have the Topps signature of success cards with an auto, 1/1. That is given a BV of $100 (with a sell value of $50-75). All three are 1/1s, yet the auto is more desirable than the GU, which is more desirable than the parallel. It's not perfect, but who cares. Neither is Beckett and if we can't figure out how much to pay for something ourselves by now...QUIT!

But in cases where they fluctuate, which is the roundabout price? What about cards that have one or two posted sales a year and they vary by that much? take the Maddux card, I paid 49 cents, someone paid $20+, if you don't find another for sale for 8 months or a year and one suddenly pops up, should he expect $1 or $20? What if Burbank gets a hold of it and one of their clients pays the overly inflated price and it goes for $44.99, or someone lists it as a Maddux parallel and doesn't include a scan or the fact that it's numbered? and it goes for the .99 cent opening bid?
 

kugelmanco

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with all the low print runs in the modern era...Beckett should start putting estimated prices in the price guides...after all they are guides, and i think it's lazy to just put no pricing avail on everything with a low print run...they should figure out a price for everything they list in the database...if they can list it, they can price it.

i like your idea and i would sign the petition...after all they do offer a price 'guide'
 
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